Searching, finding and using findings with geospatial catalogues

Markus JOBST | October 16, 2017 | 10 am

We are producing a variety of information in our daily work. Especially in archaeology the complexity of describing findings, their relation to time, culture, manufacturing and location leads to specific models that help to structure this information. The CIDOC Conceptual Reference Model (CRM) is one example for a standard cultural heritage ontology. But what if, we know how to structure our information, but cannot easily distribute it with our colleagues and other experts in the community?

We assume that location is a key indicator in cultural heritage and mapping is a central concept for documenting, structuring and communicating information. In order to make our information and knowledge structures accessible, metadata are needed to promote them. We do not only need to create descriptions of our information, but also need to publish these metadata in accessible online catalogues. These catalogues enable exploration of existing findings, publications, in situ characteristics and so on. If location is part of this information, we could easily create maps to transmit our knowledge.

Image showing the data integration of pleiades place names as result of a spatial catalogue assessment in a GIS application.

Image showing the data integration of pleiades place names as result of a spatial catalogue assessment in a GIS application.

This hands-on workshop on Archaeological Geospatial Infrastructures leads through the basic paradigm of these modern mapping technologies. Simple examples in a well prepared software framework (totally based on open source components) explain the basic methods of the Web, Service-Oriented Mapping and its services, metadata management, publishing of content and the creation of Spatial Data Infrastructures.

Screenshot of the DAI website geoserver representing a geospatial catalogue on the basis of maps.

Screenshot of the DAI website geoserver representing a geospatial catalogue on the basis of maps.

The aim of this workshop is to provide an easy access to Spatial Data Infrastructures for Cultural Heritage topics and to understand their impact for managment issues as well as world-wide initiatives for infrastructure harmonisation (like INSPIRE or the US NSDI).

Screenshot of the DAI website geoserver showing one example of the map collection.

Screenshot of the DAI website geoserver showing one example of the map collection.

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